10 Reminders for Remodelers

This week, I shared 10 pieces of encouragement/advice in Remodelers Community! I hope they are encouraging to you and that there’s one thing you can learn from and implement today!

  1. You have to say NO to some things/projects/people. You can’t be all things to all people. Focus.
     
  2. Do you realize the skill and talent it takes to be a great remodeler (like you are)? Don’t undervalue yourself.
     
  3. Please go into your late August calendar and mark off a 1/2 day and title it (ME TIME.) And do something fun that afternoon.
     
  4. I know it doesn’t always feel like it, but YOU are DOING GREAT. You’re serving your clients/team well. KEEP PUSHING FORWARD!
     
  5. Your Family/Loved Ones > Your Business. Don’t get that switched around.
     
  6. Your clients need to hear from you. Easy and effective option: RemodelersAutoPilot.com
     
  7. Stop comparing yourself to others. 
     
  8. Job # 1 – Take great care of your team. Job # 1A – Give your clients a wonderful remodeling experience.
     
  9. I’m so proud/happy of this Remodelers Community. Thank you for making it a legit community where people truly help each other.  
     
  10. You can’t get everything done. Just focus on one thing at a time. Make progress this afternoon and enjoy the work in front of you.

If #6 was a timely reminder that you need to be reaching out to your previous clients, try Remodelers AutoPilot for $1 to Stay-in-Touch with Previous Clients to Increase Word-of-Mouth Referrals, Repeat Business, and Differentiate Your Remodeling Business. Email me at kyle@remodelyourmarketing.com or text me at (517) 902-8450 if you have any questions!

It’s Just Plain Fun

On one of my Remodelers Circle mastermind calls a few weeks ago, we were discussing steps in our process that we could share on social media when Dennis Geham shared something fun they do on some of their kitchen remodel projects: 

“We do this thing, before we put the countertop on, where we hide a little time capsule in an opening behind the cabinets. We get the homeowners and the team involved. We share things specific to who they are, what’s happening in the world at the time, pictures of the team that worked on the project, photos of the homeowners (if they want to add that!), etc. It’s a fun thing and our homeowners enjoy it – great for social media posts too.”

A few reasons why I loved this idea:

  1. It’s just fun!
  2. It’s a great piece of content to share on social media!
  3. It’s a nice surprise for whoever opens it up 30 years from now!

Do you have a similar “just plain fun” idea you implement in your projects? Share below!

Implement What You Hear

Let me tell you about this screenshot. It’s from back in November. Joe dialed into a webinar from a couple of weeks ago. I’ve done some coaching with Joe and their company remodeled our basement.


One of Joe’s takeaways from the 10 Marketing Tips Webinar (which you can find here: http://remodelersontherise.com/kyles-marketing-top-10-list-for-2020) was to call previous clients.

I’m a previous client of Joe’s.

There was nothing that made me happier than 7:29 A.M. the following morning, Joe called me. Now I was in the shower so I missed his call, but Joe took action on an idea he heard.

Let this be a reminder: when you hear a good idea here or you think of a good idea, the idea is worthless unless you implement it. So implement.

It was a $90,000 project and a $3,000 retro big chill fridge.

Anthony has a beautiful retro refrigerator.

It was a $90,000 project $3,000 retro big chill fridge.

They have been great clients.

They did everything right.

They did an inspection when it was delivered.

They signed off that all looked good, wasn’t dented, etc.

And somehow, there was a dent on the inside of the fridge.

The customer hadn’t touched it.

The manufacturer said they had already signed off which left the remodelers with their hands in the air saying, “Crap, I guess we have to take responsibility for this.”

The pic you see is of the original in his office.

He ate the cost and got them a new one.

This business is hard.

But what Anthony did here is what makes him a successful remodeler. He took care of his clients.

It cost him, it hurts, and he learned new lessons to make sure this doesn’t happen again, but he put client satisfaction first.

What’s the worst example of something you had to eat that wasn’t really your fault?